FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
ADS BY GOOGLE
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Factor of safety

Factor of safety (FoS) can mean either the fraction of structural capability over that required, or a multiplier applied to the maximum expected load (force, torque, bending moment or a combination) to which a component or assembly will be subjected. The two senses of the term are completely different in that the first is a measure of the reliability of a particular design, while the second is a requirement imposed by law, standard, contract or custom. Careful engineers refer to the first sense as a factor of safety, or, to be explicit, a realized factor of safety, and the second sense as a design factor, but usage is inconsistent and confusing, so engineers need to be aware of both senses. There are several things called a Multiplier. ... In physics, force is an influence that may cause a body to accelerate. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Moment (physics). ...


The realized factor of safety is just a defnition and needs no elaboration.


Appropriate design factors are based on several considerations. Prime considerations are the accuracy of load and wear estimates, the consequences of failure, and the cost of overengineering the component to achieve that factor of safety. For example, components whose failure could result in substantial financial loss, serious injury or death usually use a safety factor of four or higher (often ten). Non-critical components generally have a design factor of two. An interesting exception is in the field of aerospace engineering, where design factors are kept low (about 1.15–1.25) because the costs associated with structural weight are so high. This low design factor is why aerospace parts and materials are subject to more stringent quality control. Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering that concerns aircraft, spacecraft, and related topics. ...


A factor of safety of 1 implies no "overengineering" at all. Hence some engineers prefer to use a related term, Margin of Safety (MoS) to describe the design parameters. The relation between MoS and FoS is MoS = FoS − 1. Margin of Safety is often described in percentage, i.e., a 50% Margin of Safety is equivalent to a factor of safety of 1.5.


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Factor of safety - Definition, explanation (367 words)
Factor of safety (FoS), also known as Safety Factor, is a multiplier applied to the calculated maximum load (force, torque, bending moment or a combination) to which a component or assembly will be subjected.
Prime considerations are the accuracy of load and wear estimates, the consequences of failure, and the cost of overengineering the component to achieve that factor of safety.
This low safety factor is why aerospace parts and materials are subject to more stringent testing and quality control.
  More results at FactBites »

 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments
Please enter the 5-letter protection code

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms.