City News
City News
Crime File
Crime File
Daily Dish & Gossip
Daily Dish & Gossip
Regional
Regional
World & National Report
World & National Report
Politics
Politics
Ideas & Opinions
Ideas & Opinions
Columnists
Columnists
That's Odd!
That's Odd!
Today's Headlines
Today's Headlines
 
Baseball
Baseball
Basketball
Basketball
World Cup
World Cup
Hockey
Hockey
More Sports
More Sports
Columnists
Columnists
Sports Odds
Sports Odds
Fantasy Sports
Fantasy Sports
 
Yankees
Yankees
Mets
Mets
 
Knicks
Knicks
Nets
Nets
 
Rangers
Rangers
Islanders
Islanders
Devils
Devils
 
Movies
Music
Television
Theater
Culture
Books
Columnists
Movie Reviews
 
 
Advice
Advice
Food
Food
Big Town
Big Town
VNY
VNY
Health
Health
Travel
Travel
Technology
Technology
Horoscopes
Horoscopes
Gridlock Sam
Gridlock Sam
Weather
Weather
Lottery
Lottery
Comics
Comics
 
NIE
NIE
RSS Feeds
RSS Feeds
Grocery Coupons
Grocery Coupons
Home Delivery
Home Delivery
Advertising
Advertising
Contact Us
Contact Us
Classified
Classified
Auto Market
Auto Market
Quick Facts
Quick Facts
Death Notices
Death Notices
 
Search for  
in 
 

Fury over loss of 9/11 heroes' health program



Daily News Exclusive


WASHINGTON — A program supposed to monitor the health of thousands of federal workers who answered the call of 9/11 has been lost for more than two years, the Daily News has learned. "We seem to have inherited our own Loch Ness monster in terms of being able to find this monitoring," said Jon Adler, vice president of the Federal Law Enforcement Officers' Association.

Programs were developed to check on the health of every other group that rushed to Ground Zero during and after the Sept. 11 attacks, primarily the World Trade Center Medical Screening Program run by the Mount Sinai Medical Center. Officials involved told The News the feds barred their workers from that program because they were setting up their own.

Unfortunately, that program vanished during the bureaucratic shuffle creating the Department of Homeland Security.

After trying for months to find out what happened, Manhattan Rep. Carolyn Maloney's office was able to uncover only that a branch of the Department of Health and Human Services got $3.7 million for the work. But it started and stopped in 2003, seeing fewer than 600 people.

"I was told there was a 'lull,'" said Maloney, who fired off a letter to HHS yesterday seeking explanations. "This is unacceptable, these men and women are certainly not experiencing a lull in the health effects they are suffering from exposure to toxins at Ground Zero."

An HHS spokesman insisted the program had not been lost, but that screeners with the Federal Occupational Health Service ran into more problems than they expected.

"It was put on a temporary hold while we have been fixing those problems," said Bill Hall, an HHS spokesman. He could not explain the problems or why monitoring stopped for more than two years. He said it would resume soon with workers who signed up originally.

But of nearly a dozen federal law enforcers contacted by The News, only one said he ever got a chance to ask for monitoring.

"We're not asking for anything crazy," said an investigator who wants to sign up. "We just want someone to take a look at us in case, God forbid, 20 years down the line we start getting some strange kinds of cancer from everything we were exposed to down there."

Originally published on August 26, 2005

Fresh stories hot off the site every day via RSS!
Have stories like this emailed right to your inbox!
Email this story
Printer-friendly version



Click here
Home | News & Views | Sports | Entertainment | Business |  Boroughs |  City Life |  Services


All contents 2006 Daily News, L.P.
Terms and Conditions of Use | Privacy Policy